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Kwale giant dam opens in three months 

A section of Mkanda dam  water project. Photo by  KNA.




The Water and Irrigation Principal Secretary, Prof. Fred Segor  while  on   inspection tour of water projects, including Mkanda Dam in Kwale County on Monday November 20, 2017. Photo by KNA.

The Water and Irrigation Principal Secretary, Prof. Fred Segor while on inspection tour of water projects, including Mkanda Dam in Kwale County on Monday November 20, 2017. Photo by KNA.

The  Water  Principal  Secretary (PS), Prof. Fred  Segor, has assured Kwale residents that the Sh.150million Mkanda Dam project  will be completed and commissioned in three months’ time as parts of the government’s wider plan to address perennial water shortage in the County.

Prof. Segor said once operational, the project will supply fresh drinking water to residents in Msambweni and Lunga Lunga Sub-counties which have been water-stressed for many years.

Mkanda is one of the major dams in the region, the others being Nyalani, Mkurumuzi, and the proposed Mwache dam.

“We are now in phase III of this project and early next year, the targeted residents will begin to enjoy plenty of fresh water,” the PS said, noting that 80 percent of the construction work was complete.

Speaking  on Monday during an inspection tour of water projects in the County the PS said that the government is undertaking at least 10 water projects in the region at a cost of Sh.1.4billion through Coast Water Services Board.

Prof. Segor said the dam is among the major water projects in the country geared towards the realization of Vision 2030.

The PS also inspected Perani Water Pipeline which will be commissioned in April next year.

“Our mandate is to ensure that we provide water to all citizens for domestic use and for agriculture to be food secure as a country,” he said.

With such major projects in the County, water shortage will be a thing of the past to locals, Prof. Segor noted.

By  James  Muchai

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